Posts Tagged ‘construction safety’


Construction Work Accidents- Where Do the Risks Lie?

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Every year in the UK, the HSE releases detailed statistics on the number of injuries and accidents that have been reported and how they have been caused. Key figures from 2012/2013 reveal that the number of accidents and injuries within the construction industry have continued to fall. Fatal accidents totaled 39 that year compared to an average of 53 over the previous five years, major injuries are more common with 1913 being reported to employers while the average number of reported cases over the previous five years was 2815, and 3133 cases of seven-day injuries were reported that year compared to an average of 5986 from the past five years. The decline is thanks to more stringent health and safety precautions being taken by employers to comply with the law. However, the construction industry still holds the highest percentage (26%) of all fatal injuries across all sectors included; which shows that there is still a fair amount of work to be done to further reduce the number of fatal accidents and bring this percentage down. To read the full article, click here…

Warning: Chinese steel imports could be safety threat

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

UK Steel and the British Association of Reinforcement and steel unions are expressing their growing concern with use of imported Chinese steel in construction in the UK for several reasons. Not only are the cheap imports being named as the cause for 720 job cuts in Tata’s steel works factory in South Yorkshire, it’s inadequate strength and quality is now being identified as a threat to construction safety. When additives (like boron) are included in the manufacture of Chinese steel, the manufacturer’s get a tax rebate since it will be classed as an alloy, but it also affects the material’s strength and makes it more likely to crack if the wrong welding technique is applied. Current regulations do not require steelmakers to specify the amount of boron added in their rebar (reinforced bar), which is mainly used to help fortify concrete. This means companies may not be aware that they are using weaker material and putting the safety of their structure and their personnel at risk. Construction firms are now being urged to only purchase steel whose provenance can be traced under the Charter for Sustainable British Steel campaign to ensure quality and construction safety standards are safeguarded. Click here to read the full article…

Managing Suspected Drug Use at the Jobsite

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

According to research conducted by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), the construction trade ranks the highest among different professions when it comes to heroin use (with a 3.25 standard deviation from the average rate of abuse/dependence). Also, the drugs prescribed to relieve a construction worker’s back pain or any sustained injury, for example, can be extremely addictive. This, coupled with the fact that construction sites now use more technology and heavy machinery to save on work and costs, makes having an opiate-impaired employee around the construction site an extremely dangerous situation. The challenge is detecting crew members who are taking heroin or illegal prescription drugs, and what stage they are cycling through (under the influence or in withdrawal). It is also important to be able to know how to handle these employees and assist them in getting help. Certainly, turning a blind eye is not an option with all the lives that are at stake. To read more about it, click here…

Wi-Fi sensors could streamline construction safety and production

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

In construction sites, where safety is of primary concern, wireless network (Wi-Fi) technology may soon be used to avoid hazards and save lives. This technology is currently being deployed in refineries and chemical plants where keeping track of the contractors that come in and ensuring that they stay within authorized zones can be hard to manage. Creating a Wi-Fi environment at the location with the use of ID tags, body-worn sensors and sensor stations allow for monitoring of air quality, movement, location and temperature. More sophisticated sensors can also be used to check personnel heart rates or body conditions, or monitor equipment and infrastructure for possible breakdowns. The analytics and queries that could be run using the data compiled by these sensors can not only predict possible common failures but also anticipate disruptive issues that may arise and allow for preventive maintenance to be undertaken. This could prevent or greatly reduce any downtime in the operation and provide lead time in ordering parts. Read the full article here…